Bolton Classic Car Rally has returned

A CLASSIC car rally, last held eight years ago, is making a comeback to Bolton to raise money for the mayor’s charity which will provide funds for Bolton Hospice, Bolton Lads and Girls Club, and the Sensory Centre for the Blind and Fortalice.

So far 50 vehicles of all ages and makes which includes Fred Dibnah’s Land Rover have been signed up for the classic car run which will start in Victoria Square, Bolton, and take in 50 miles of the Lancashire countryside.

The rally, on Sunday, April 6, will set off from Victoria Square at 10.30am at which point the participants will be given their route, which is kept a mystery until the day.

Prescott Bike Festival

Prescott Bike Festival takes place on Sunday April 6, featuring plenty of action on the Prescott hillclimb near Cheltenham as well as a host of family activities with proceeds going to the Nationwide Association of Blood Bikes and Severn Freewheelers.

The fourth annual event will be larger than ever before, with even more bike manufacturers and clubs confirmed, plus a large display of historic, modern and race bikes on display in the paddock, demo areas, passenger rides, stunt show, trade stalls, live music, good food and a host of entertainment both on and off the track to keep the whole family amused.

Special guest appearances include: former three times British Superbike Champion and Bloodbike ambassador John Reynolds, MotoGP commentator Steve Parrish, racer Michael Rutter and motorcycle adventurer Nick Sanders.

Do community speed watch volunteers work?

Lots of villages now have speed watch volunteers.  The question is whether or not they have a long term impact on speed and accident reduction?

The main people who drive over the limit are mostly mums driving their kids to and from school, followed by the infamous white van man.

The speed watch volunteers spend their time recording speeds through their villages, but despite the fluorescent jackets, their powers are limited.  If a driver far exceeds the speed limit say by 10mph they can write to the local police with the vehicle details.  Officers will then check that the vehicle is being driven legally and then write to them warning them about their speeding.

Suffolk Police state that since their CSW initiative started in 2009, 51 schemes have been set up across the county with the volunteers are trained by police, sites are vetted and then volunteers are left to decide how often they operate.

Suffolk Police have issued nearly 43000 fixed penalty notices for speeding in 2012 with 16000 licences endorsed and 2900 prosecutions.  The fastest recording speeding offence was 129mph in a 70mph zone.

Kevin Clinton, head of road safety at the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA), has said that Community Speed Watch schemes can be a useful way of monitoring speeds and encouraging drivers to stay within limits.

What do you think?

 

Beware Category D Write Offs

Thousands of cars which have been written off by insurance companies are finding their way back on to the second hand market every year – and it is all legal. They can save buyers hundreds – if not thousands – of pounds, but experts warn that they can also be a source of trouble down the line.

Write-offs which reappear in this way are known as Category D cars under a voluntary code of practice signed by various organisations, including insurance companies, salvage and repair agencies and the police. The agreement puts accident-damaged cars into one of four categories. Category D is for the most lightly damaged cars, or those which were stolen and recovered after the owner had been paid by the insurance company.

The official description of a Category D car is one that has suffered accident damage that would cost less to repair than its value. But why would an insurer write off a perfectly repairable car? Ironically, according to experts, the insurance company cuts its losses this way.

Imagine that a car worth £5,000 is lightly damaged in a minor accident. The insurer may have to pay to have it towed to an approved repairer and stored. It will have to send out an assessor to inspect the damage, and may have to cover the owner’s costs for a hire car. There could also be personal injury expenses.

If the airbags have gone off, replacing them can easily add £2,000 to the repair bill, and features such as seat-belt tensioners or parking sensors will increase it further. With insurers able to claim up to 65 per cent of the car’s value from salvage companies, they can often be in pocket by writing the car off and allowing an independent garage with lower overheads to repair it.