Do community speed watch volunteers work?

Lots of villages now have speed watch volunteers.  The question is whether or not they have a long term impact on speed and accident reduction?

The main people who drive over the limit are mostly mums driving their kids to and from school, followed by the infamous white van man.

The speed watch volunteers spend their time recording speeds through their villages, but despite the fluorescent jackets, their powers are limited.  If a driver far exceeds the speed limit say by 10mph they can write to the local police with the vehicle details.  Officers will then check that the vehicle is being driven legally and then write to them warning them about their speeding.

Suffolk Police state that since their CSW initiative started in 2009, 51 schemes have been set up across the county with the volunteers are trained by police, sites are vetted and then volunteers are left to decide how often they operate.

Suffolk Police have issued nearly 43000 fixed penalty notices for speeding in 2012 with 16000 licences endorsed and 2900 prosecutions.  The fastest recording speeding offence was 129mph in a 70mph zone.

Kevin Clinton, head of road safety at the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA), has said that Community Speed Watch schemes can be a useful way of monitoring speeds and encouraging drivers to stay within limits.

What do you think?

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>